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The Vice-device

709 Ft 2 835 Ft

Sorozatcím: Papers in English & American Studies XIX.

Alcím: Iago and Lear’s Fool as Agents of Representational Crisis

Szerző: Matuska Ágnes

Kiadás éve: 2011

ISBN 978 963 315 044 3

Súly: 304 g

Egyéb információk: 180 g, B/5, kartonált, fóliázott, angol nyelven

On the Fool, the Vice, Sir John Falstaff, the Bakhtinian carnival laughter, Othello, King Lear, Derrida and more.

Epubként is megvásárolható

 

CONTENTS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

FOREWORD

INTRODUCTION

SHAKESPEARE’S DIALECTICAL TRAGEDY AND THE CRUMBLING CODE OF REPRESENTATION

1.1 The question of epistemological crisis

1.2 Dialectical Tragedy: epistemic change in theatre

1.3 „If a code is crumbling…”

1.4 Representational crisis in Shakespeare

HAPHAZARDLY AMBIDEXTROUS: THE VICE-FAMILY

2.1 Problems of definition

„You will learn to playe the vice”: problems of interpretation

2.2 Vices

Merry Report

Ambidexter

Haphazard

Punisher or punished?

The Fool in the Vice

2.3 Vice-successors and Fools

Intriguer villains

Sir John Falstaff. The Vice-Fool

The „corrupter of words”: Feste

Deceiver among deceivers: Parolles

Afterlife of post-vices and the common life of Iago and the Fool

2.4 The Vice-clown on the Shakespearean stage

METADRAMA

3.1 Metadrama and the Vice. A definition of the term

3.1.1 The Vice as mediator

3.1.2 Metadrama in Shakespeare-criticism

3.2 Meaning as an event – iago and Metadrama in Othello

3.2.1 Commenting on drama, involving the audience

3.2.2 Iago’s book of identity and role-playing

3.2.3 Plays within – Iago as director

3.2.4 Representation as fiction

3.2.5 Iago’s metadramatic effect–summary

3.3 Metadramatic aspects of the Fool

3.3.1 The Fool and his audience

3.3.2 „All thy other titles”

3.3.3 Plays of the fool within and without

3.3.4 „The mistery of things”: fiction as reality

3.3.5 Metadrama of the Fool - summary

3.4 Metadrama: conclusion

LAUGHTER AND COMEDY

4.1 Carnival and subversion in the comedy of the Vice, Iago and the Fool

4.1.1 Elements of Vice-comedy in Iago and the Fool

4.1.2 Bakhtinian carnival laughter

4.1.3 Types of laughter in Medieval drama

4.1.4 Bakhtinian carnival and laughter in Shakespeare

4.2 The comedy of the Fool

4.2.1 Levelling

4.2.2 A pretty reason: the sense-nonsense game

4.2.3 generating extra perspectives: the Fool’s way of recontextualization

4.2.4 The Fool’s final score

4.3 The comedy of Iago

4.3.1 Iagos’s sense of humour dislodged

4.3.2 irony and the question of the absurd

4.3.3 Decontextualisation

4.3.4 Iago’s sense of humour – conclusion

4.4 Two comedians: alike, but different

4.4.1 The similarities betveen the comedy of Iago and the Fool

4.4.2 The differences in the comedy of Iago and the Fool

4.4.3. Iago as the missing fool

KING LEAR AND OTHELLO AS CONTEXTS OF PLAYING

5.1 Meaning and identity in King Lear

5.1.1 The king who stopped playing

The dance of Death and the Fool

5.1.2 „the tyranny of the open night”: The end and beyond

5.2 Social structure and meaning in Othello

5.2.1 „Past thought!”: Society and its „Others”

5.2.2 The denial of folly

5.3 Moral corruption, amoral presence, or authenticity?

5.4 „Tarry, take the Fool with thee”: On problems with Shakespeare, Derridean spectacles and theatre

5.4.1 Is language enough?

5.4.2 The Iconoclasts’ Scourge

CONCLUSION

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX OF PLAYS AND CHARACTERS